[REF] The M1 Rifle

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[REF] The M1 Rifle

Post  Les Brock on Sat Apr 18, 2009 6:25 pm

History of the US Rifle .30 Caliber M1 Garand


Specifications

Operation: Semiautomatic, Gas Operated

Caliber: .30 (.30-06)

Length: 43.6 in. (1103 mm)

Weight unloaded: 9 lb 8 oz (4.37 kg)

Barrel:24 in. 4 grooves, right hand twist

Magazine: 8 round internal box, clip loaded, clip ejected after last round fired

Muzzle Velocity: 2800 fps, 2903 ft-lb

500 yds: 1918 fps, 1362 ft-lbs

Ammunition: 174 gr bullet, 50 gr charge, Ball M1

Effective Range: 440 yds

Classification: "Standard" from 1936 until M14 adopted in 1957

Total production: Approx. 4,040,000



"In my opinion, the M1 Rifle is the greatest battle implement ever devised."
LGEN George S. Patton, Jr.



The M1 Garand is a full blown combat rifle with maximum range of 3,200 meters and maximum effective range of 400 meters...or the greatest distance at which the weapon can be expected to fire accurately to inflict casualties or damage. Fully loaded with 8-round en bloc clip, cleaning kit in butt stock, sling and with stock of dense GI issue wood the M1 weighed in at 11-1/4 lbs. The M1 came into production in 1936 using the .30-06 rifle cartridge. The M1 was the designated service rifle of World War II and the Korean War for the United States Military. It was designed for semi-automatic fire using a spring steel clip containing 8 rounds. This is where the term "clip" originated. All other rifles used a detachable or fixed magazine. (There is some discussion on whether this is accurate, if you have a comment, please enter it on our Bulletin Board.) The M1 Garand was designed for long range accuracy i.e. battle zero was set for any target less than 200 yards It was the only rifle that had fully adjustable i.e. windage and elevation, rear sights.


The M1C, manufactured by Springfield Armory in late 1944-1945, mounted either a M81 or M82 scope, a T4 leather cheek pad, and an M2 flash hider. The The original rear sight of the M1 would not hold adjustments very well, so a locking bar was added in late 1942 which could be tightened after sights were set.


The US Rifle M1 was the first semiautomatic rifle to be the standard small arm of the US Military, and the first semiautomatic rifle to be adopted by a major military power. It was the product of a genuine genius, John Cantius Garand. While the M1 Rifle was never officially referred to as the Garand, it is known by no other name so widely. First adopted in 1936, the M1 Rifle served the US in World War II, Korea, a host of "police actions" and interventions, and, in the hands of allies, in the Vietnam War. Even there the US Army fielded accurized sniper M1 rifles even though the M1 had by that time been supplanted by the M14 and later the M16.


To many the M1 Rifle has a classic elegance and grace characteristic of a bygone era, when steel was forged in white heat and walnut was carefully shaped for both form and function. "There will never be again such a rifle, so brimming with the genius of an individual mind, so well constructed to outlive us all, so sculpted as to ask the hand to caress."


Criticisms of the M1 are its weight, limited ammunition supply, the fact that single rounds could not be pushed in (8 round clip, or nothing). Also, the spent clip was automatically ejected after the last round was fired, making a distinctive sound, which could be fatal in close quarter or sniper operations.


As a supplement to the Garand the M1 Carbine was developed. It was totally different design philosophy with a smaller, less powerful cartridge and an effective range of 300 yds max. It weighed almost exactly 1/2 that of the M1 Garand. In many ways you could think of the M1 Carbine as a moderately powerful, two-handed, long-barreled auto pistol with a shoulder stock.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


(Verbatim from FM 23-5 U.S. Rifle Caliber .30, M1)


Disassembly into the Three Main Groups :


A. The three main groups are the trigger housing group, the barrel and receiver group and the stock group.


B. To disassemble the rifle into the three main groups, first insure that the weapon is clear and then allow the bolt to go forward by depressing the follower with the right thumb and allowing the bolt to ride forward over the follower assembly. (note: careful, m1's are always hungry and eat thumbs).


C. Place the rifle butt against the left thigh, sights to the left. With the thumb and forefinger of the right hand, pull downward and outward on the rear of the trigger guard. Swing the trigger guard out as far as it will go and lift out the trigger housing group.


D. To separate the barrel and receiver from the stock lay the weapon on a flat surface with the sights up, muzzle to the left. With the left hand, grasp the rear of the receiver and raise the rifle. With the right hand, give a downward blow, grasping the small of the stock. This will separate the stock group from the barrel and receiver group.


Last edited by Les Brock on Sat Apr 18, 2009 6:36 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Re: [REF] The M1 Rifle

Post  Les Brock on Sat Apr 18, 2009 6:32 pm

Instructional chart series















Last edited by Les Brock on Sat Apr 18, 2009 6:51 pm; edited 2 times in total
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Re: [REF] The M1 Rifle

Post  Les Brock on Sat Apr 18, 2009 6:35 pm












Last edited by Les Brock on Sat Apr 18, 2009 6:50 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Re: [REF] The M1 Rifle

Post  Les Brock on Sat Apr 18, 2009 6:48 pm

U.S. RIFLE M1 GARAND
SERIAL NUMBER RANGES


[dated by calendar year: January December]

Assigned serial numbers.
1?100000 Springfield Armory
100001?165500 Winchester R.A. Co.
165501?865500 Springfield Armory
865501?1200000 Springfield Armory
1200001?1261260 Winchester R.A. Co.
1261261?1357473 Winchester R.A. Co.
1357474?1380000 Duplicate Numbers by W.R.A.
1357474?2305849 Springfield Armory
2305850?2655849 Winchester R.A. Co.
X2655982?X2656148 RIA
2656149?4200000 Springfield Armory
4200001?4399999 Springfield Armory
4400000?4660000 International Harvester
4660001?4800000 Harrington & Richardson
4800001?4999999 Not assigned
5000000?5000500 Springfield Armory
5000501?5278245 International Harvester
5278246?5488246 Springfield Armory
5488847?5793847 Harrington & Richardson
5793848?6099905 Springfield Armory


Winchester's serial numbering system appears to have changed in January 1945. This seems to be about the time W.R.A. switched from 2.5 million serial numbers to 1.6 million. These are often referred to as WIN?13 rifles. The 2.5 million numbers stopped in the area of 2,535,XXX which places it about 39,000 rifles from the end of production in June 1945. It is believed that approximately 40,000 WIN?13 rifles were produced. In addition, rifles in the 1.6 million serial number range have been observed ranging from number 1,602,XXX through 1,639,XXX. All of this supports the January 1945 date for the serial number range change.



[year & month w/final monthly serial#]

SPRINGFIELD ARMORY
1932?1934 80 [pre-production models]

1937
AUG?120
SEP?307
OCT?539
NOV?696
DEC?1034

1938
JAN?1186
FEB?1338
MAR?1809
APR?2213

MAY?2406
JUN?2911
JUL?2911
AUG?3537
SEP?4386
OCT?5242
NOV?6072
DEC?6972

1939
JAN?7715
FEB?8762
MAR?9893
APR?10703
MAY?11511
JUN?12848
JUL?12911
AUG?14823
SEP?17010
OCT?19410
NOV?21293
DEC?23567

1940
JAN?26729
FEB?30008
MAR?33790
APR?38034
MAY?41679
JUN?46221
JUL?51970
AUG?59868
SEP?68054
OCT?78306
NOV?90177
DEC?100000 & 165001 to 169073

1941
JAN?183519
FEB?197811
MAR?211228
APR?228527
MAY?248757
JUN?269686
JUL?296252
AUG?324301
SEP?349442
OCT?377258
NOV?401529
DEC?429811

1942
JAN?462737
FEB?498216
MAR?542494
APR?588879
MAY?638679
JUN?691401
JUL?749779
AUG?809016
SEP?872343
OCT?940250
NOV?1008899
DEC?1090310

1943
JAN?1169091
FEB?1200000 & 1357474?1396255
MAR?1469177
APR?1547452
MAY?1629565
JUN?1710012
JUL?1786469
AUG?1877654
SEP?1978407
OCT?2092825
NOV?2204430
DEC?2305849

1944
JAN?2543412
FEB?2634316
MAR?2723004
APR?2810628
MAY?2900312
JUN?2981126
JUL?3051952
AUG?3114434
SEP?3180532
OCT?3242497
NOV?3302641
DEC?3359159

1945
JAN?3450503
FEB?3532489
MAR?3627442
APR?3717867
MAY?3797768
JUN?3875601
JUL

AUG?3888081
SEP
OCT

WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO.
1941
JAN?100501
FEB?100831
MAR?102701
APR?104901
MAY?107801
JUN?111501
JUL?115501
AUG?120111
SEP?122081
OCT?126130
NOV?131130
DEC?137960

1942
JAN?144110
FEB?149130
MAR?155310
APR?162190
MAY?165500 & 1200001?1203692
JUN?1210472
JUL?1218972
AUG?1228982
SEP?1241002
OCT?1254002
NOV?1266502
DEC?1276102

1943
JAN?1282762
FEB?1294762
MAR?1309772
APR?1323872
MAY?1336882
JUN?1349982
JUL?1364982
AUG?1380000 & 2305850?2305932
SEP?2318032
OCT?2334032
NOV?2349632
DEC?2364642

1944
JAN?2379642
FEB?2394642
MAR?2409642
APR?2424642
MAY?2439642
JUN?2454642
JUL?2469642
AUG?2484642
SEP?2499642
OCT?2513822
NOV?2523942
DEC?2533142

1945
JAN?2536600 (Mid?January to June 30 are WIN?13 rifles. Their serial number range is approximately 1600000 to 1640000).


Production records of M1 Rifles immediately following WWII until the outbreak of hostilities in Korea are less precise than for the WWII period. The last rifle produced during WWII by Springfield Armory WWII lies in the 3,888,xxx serial number range with production ending in October 1945. Springfield M1 production was resumed in 1952 with serial number 4,200,000 leaving a gap of approximately 312,xxx serial numbers


Post WWII production totals: (approx.)

Springfield Armory: 661,747 (from 1952 1956)
Harrington & Richardson Arms: 428,600 (from 1953 1956)
International Harvester Corporation: 337,623 (from 1953 1956)

1952 1956 Assigned Serial Number Ranges:

Not Assigned N/A
4,800,001 to 4,999,999

Springfield Armory
1952 1954 sn#4,200,001 to 4,399,999
Aug. 1952 sn#5,000,000 to 5,000,500
1954 1955 sn#5,278,246 to 5,488,246
1955 1957 sn#5,793,848 to 6,099,905

International Harvester
1953 1954 sn#4,400,000 to 4,660,000
1954 1956 sn#5,000,501 to 5,278,245



Harrington & Richardson
1953 1954 sn#4,660,001 to 4,800,000
1954 1956 sn#5,488,247 to 5,793,847
Assigned to HRA from Springfield s/n range for a 400-rifle contract overrun:
Aug. 1956 sn#6,034,330 to 6,034,729
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Re: [REF] The M1 Rifle

Post  samharris45 on Sat Apr 18, 2009 7:22 pm

Hi mate

Really good thread and loads of good info!

Just one question however

If the info is correct my M1 has the serial number of 1010211 so therefore should be made by Winchester is that correct?

However my M1 is made by Springfield?

Confused.....
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Re: [REF] The M1 Rifle

Post  Les Brock on Sat Apr 18, 2009 7:42 pm

The tables below list only the Springfield Armory and

the Winchester Repeating Arms Company serial numbers.



Springfield Armory


Springfield Armory production 1932 - 34 : 80



Year/Month
Serial # at end of Month

1937
August
120

September
307

October
539

November
696

December
1,034


Year/Month
Serial # at end of Month

1938
January
1,186

February
1,338

March
1,809

April
2,213

May
2,406

June
2,911

July
2,911

August
3,537

September
4,386

October
5,242

November
6,072

December
6,972


Year/Month
Serial # at end of Month

1939
January
7,715

February
8,762

March
9,893

April
10,703

May
11,511

June
12,848

July
12,911

August
14,823

September
17,010

October
19,410

November
21,293

December
23,567


Year/Month
Serial # at end of Month

1940
January
26,729

February
30,008

March
33,790

April
38,034

May
41,679

June
46,221

July
51,970

August
59,868

September
68,054

October
78,306

November
90,177

December
100,000 - 165,501

to 169,073


Year/Month
Serial # at end of Month

1941
January
183,519

February
197,811

March
211,288

April
228,527

May
248,757

June
269,686

July
296,252

August
324,301

September
349,442

October
377,258

November
401,529

December
429,811


Year/Month
Serial # at end of Month

1942
January
462,737

February
498,216

March
542,494

April
588,879

May
638,679

June
691,401

July
749,779

August
809,016

September
872,343

October
940,250

November
1,008,899

December
1,090,310


Year/Month
Serial # at end of Month

1943
January
1,169,091

February
1,200,000 & 1,357,474

to 1,396,255

March
1,469,177

April
1,547,452

May
1,629,565

June
1,710,012

July
1,786,469

August
1,877,654

September
1,978,407

October
2,092,825

November
2,204,430

December
2,305,849 & 2,410,000

to 2,420,191


Year/Month
Serial # at end of Month

1944
January
2,543,412

February
2,634,316

March
2,723,004

April
2,810,312

May
2,900,312

June
2,981,126

July
3,051,952

August
3,114,434

September
3,180,532


November
3,302,641

December
3,359,159


Year/Month
Serial # at end of Month

1945
January
3,450,503

February
3,531,489

March
3,672,442

April
3,717,867

May
3,797,768

June
3,875,601

July
Unknown

August
Unknown

September
Unknown

October
3,888,081




Winchester Repeating Arms Company


M1 Garand collectors may note some duplication of Springfield and Winchester

serial numbers, particularly in the range of 2,305,800 to 2,533,400 range.



Year/Month
Serial # at end of Month

1941
January
100,501

February
100,831

March
102,701

April
104,901

May
107,801

June
111,501

July
115,501

August
120,111

September
122,081

October
126,130

November
131,130

December
137,960


Year/Month
Serial # at end of Month

1942
January
144,110

February
149,130

March
155,310

April
162,190

May
165,500 & 1,200,001

to 1,203,692

June
1,210,472

July
1,218,972

August
1,228,982

September
1,241,002

October
1,254,002

November
1,266,502


Year/Month
Serial # at end of Month

1943
January
1,282,762

February
1,294,762

March
1,309,772

April
1,323,872

May
1,336,882

June
1,349,982

July
1,364,982

August
1,380,000 & 2,305,850 -

2,305,932

September
2,318,032

October
2,334,032

November
2,349,632

December
2,364,642


Year/Month
Serial # at end of Month

1944
January
2,379,642

February
2,394,642

March
2,409,642

April
2,242,642

May
2,439,642

June
2,454,642

July
2,469,642

August
2,484,642

September
2,499,642

October
2,513,822

November
2,523,942

December
2,533,142


Year/Month
Serial # at end of Month

1945
January
2,534,232 & 1,600,000

to 1,605,600

February
1,607,100

March
1,613,000

April
1,620,000

May
1,627,000

June
1,640,000




No monthly range of serial numbers has yet been developed for Post-World War II production of the M1 Garand. Following are the serial number blocks assigned to Springfield Armory and the two prime contractors, International Harvester and Harrington & Richardson Arms.

Manufacturer
Serial # Range
Quantity

Springfield
4,200,001 - 4,399,999

5,000,000 - 5,000,500

5,278,246 - 5,488,246

5,793,848 - 6,099,905
1,999,998
499

210,000

306,057

International

Harvester
4,440,000 - 4,660,000
5,000,501 - 5,278,245
260,000
277,744

Harrington &

Richardson
4,660,001 - 4,800,000
5,488,247 - 5,793,847
139,999
306,600


Sam here is another list I have you will see there is some duplication atound that number for both Winchester and Springfield
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Re: [REF] The M1 Rifle

Post  samharris45 on Sat Apr 18, 2009 11:00 pm

Now that makes sence! Cheers Les

Sam
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Re: [REF] The M1 Rifle

Post  Guest on Sun Apr 19, 2009 2:08 pm

Hi Les,
Great Article, thanks for posting. It's certainly great to see some additional information about the M1. I wonder whether or not it would be worthwhile moving into the numerous stock cartouches and inspector marks, and things like that next?
Cheers,
Ben.

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Re: [REF] The M1 Rifle

Post  samharris45 on Sun Apr 19, 2009 9:38 pm

BenM wrote:Hi Les,
Great Article, thanks for posting. It's certainly great to see some additional information about the M1. I wonder whether or not it would be worthwhile moving into the numerous stock cartouches and inspector marks, and things like that next?
Cheers,
Ben.

Oh now you have opened a wole can of worms.............
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Re: [REF] The M1 Rifle

Post  Bazooka Joe on Wed Oct 13, 2010 3:29 pm

Here is an interesting little pdf from the Garand Collectors Association:

http://www.thegca.org/pdfs/glossary-terms2.pdf

There's a pile of these lying at the range where I shoot sometimes, so if anyone wants a paper copy just let me know.

Cheers
Joe
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